VM: A positive mammo case

A mortal dread of surgery had kept VM from having a lump on her left breast checked sooner. Then, realizing that no amount of prayers would make the lump go away and that it was just steadily growing bigger, she finally decided to seek medical consult. A 12/13/2011 bilateral mammogram confirmed a suspicious 12 mm. rounded density on her left breast, and yet another non-palpable one deep in her right breast. She brought the results to my brother, the doctor, sometime before Christmas hoping to be referred to me for Metabolic Therapy (MT). She was however advised after examination to first have a biopsy to help identify the type of, if indeed it was, cancer so that a more suited chemotherapy could be prescribed after surgery. Continue reading

Checking out supply of bitter almonds

An August 28 comment from Alexander Tessier that true bitter almond is difficult to come by, but that apricot kernels are often referred to as bitter almonds, spurred me to go buy a whole 3-kilo-bag of co-hein from the Chinese drugstore. I had planned to have a friend translate the product info printed in green on the packaging for me. But as chance would have it, Ching Tay’s available stock, this time, came in a different packaging. APRICOT KERNELS NORTH SKIN was boldly printed on the front of a green and white bag. The nuts were not bitter! They opened several North Skin bags but all were the same: not at all bitter! The proprietress confirmed that there was no Chinese character for ‘bitter’ indicated in the packaging.

They asked for my contact numbers and promised to call as soon as bitter stock arrives. Laetrile, though, is available at the Navarro Medical Clinic.

BITTER ALMONDS: VERY RICH SOURCE OF VITAMIN B17 (Laetrile/Amygdalin)

Bitter Almond Nuts are a very rich source of Vitamin B17 and is Dr Efren Navarro’s suggested substitute when Laetrile capsules are out of stock. Available in Chinese drugstores in downtown Manila, the bitter almond nut, familiarly known as Co-Hein (pronounced co-heng), is light cream in color and comes in split halves. Dr. Navarro has cancer patients take 15-20 split halves of the bitter almond nuts after every meal. To help estimate the volume to buy at a time, I counted 750 split halves of varying sizes, plus broken pieces and slivers in 100 gms. Continue reading

Food sources rich in Vitamin B17 (Amygdalin)

Locally, cassava remains the best known source of Vitamin B17.

Tiesa comes a close second.  It is unfortunate though that most people find ripe tiesa bothersome to eat as it sticks to the roof of the mouth besides the fact that its distinctive ripe smell reminds one of a newborn baby’s poo (soiled diaper?).

Also high in Vitamin B17 are sampalok or tamarind, singkamas, duhat, luya or ginger, white and yellow, and patani or lima beans.

Though sampalok is seasonal here, tamarind from Malaysia are found in some of our fruit stalls and supermarkets all year round.  I snack on sampalok on an empty stomach, about 2-3 hours after a meal to maximize benefits of its VitB17 content.

Young (meaning small) and freshly harvested singkamas makes a sweet and crunchy snack by itself, and really smacking good when dipped, even better   marinated, in a concoction of apple cider vinegar, brown sugar, and sea salt, then seasoned with black pepper.

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Control Cancer Naturally

I’m not saying cancer can be cured but, much like diabetes, it can be controlled without using toxic chemicals.  For Mama, who lived 27 more years after being diagnosed with stage IV cancer, all it took was to follow the orders of G. Edward Griffin in the book World Without Cancer—The Story of Vitamin B17, which bears repeating:

“…avoid excessive damage or stress to the body, minimize foods that pre-empt the pancreatic enzymes for their digestion, and maintain a diet rich in all minerals and vitamins—especially vitamin B17.”

Now, if cancer is so easily manageable through a nutritional approach, with relatively cheap and wholly natural remedies, why are these not being promoted?  Why all the brouhaha, why the billions of dollars taken up by/for cancer research?  The answer lies in what Griffin calls “the politics of cancer therapy.”

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