The Case For Laetrile (Amygdalin/Vitamin B17)

In the Preface to his book Alive and Well (1994) Dr. Philip E. Binzel writes: “The facts in this book are true. The names are real (except where I say they are not). The dates may not be completely accurate, but they are as close as I can remember.”

Chapter One: Case Dismissed

It was early December, 1977. My office girl, Ruthie Coe, called me on my intercom to tell me that I had a phone call from a Mr. Robert Bradford in California. She wanted to know if I wanted to take the call now or to call him back. I had known Bob Bradford for about three years. He was the head of an organization known as The Committee for Freedom of Choice in Cancer Therapy. I had done several seminars on nutrition with him. I told Ruthie that I would take the call now.

Continue reading

Update on BITTER APRICOT KERNELS and bitter almonds

Alexander Tessier’s comment that ‘true bitter almonds are very difficult to come by,’ is so true. I have yet to find bitter almonds locally. So far, all I’ve come across are apricot kernels. His comment that apricot kernels are often referred to as bitter almonds and how not all apricot kernels are bitter as they do come sweet, are all so true, too. (http:/ /apricot-kernels.blogspot.com.au/2010/11/apricot-kernels-which-should-be-used.html) Continue reading

Kamoteng Kahoy Tea (2)

See my January 19, 2012 post Kamoteng Kahoy Tea must be FRESHLY prepared daily 

Because the diameter of the cassava root was only an approximate 3-4 cm, adding 1/2 inch daily of available cassava root left much to be desired in terms of trying to establish an empirical dose. With a 4 cm. diameter cassava root on hand, I figured that weighing a peeled 3 ½ inch length, using a diet scale, would give a consistent baseline to start with: the diet scale showed 125 gm. Continue reading

Checking out supply of bitter almonds

An August 28 comment from Alexander Tessier that true bitter almond is difficult to come by, but that apricot kernels are often referred to as bitter almonds, spurred me to go buy a whole 3-kilo-bag of co-hein from the Chinese drugstore. I had planned to have a friend translate the product info printed in green on the packaging for me. But as chance would have it, Ching Tay’s available stock, this time, came in a different packaging. APRICOT KERNELS NORTH SKIN was boldly printed on the front of a green and white bag. The nuts were not bitter! They opened several North Skin bags but all were the same: not at all bitter! The proprietress confirmed that there was no Chinese character for ‘bitter’ indicated in the packaging.

They asked for my contact numbers and promised to call as soon as bitter stock arrives. Laetrile, though, is available at the Navarro Medical Clinic.

BITTER ALMONDS: VERY RICH SOURCE OF VITAMIN B17 (Laetrile/Amygdalin)

Bitter Almond Nuts are a very rich source of Vitamin B17 and is Dr Efren Navarro’s suggested substitute when Laetrile capsules are out of stock. Available in Chinese drugstores in downtown Manila, the bitter almond nut, familiarly known as Co-Hein (pronounced co-heng), is light cream in color and comes in split halves. Dr. Navarro has cancer patients take 15-20 split halves of the bitter almond nuts after every meal. To help estimate the volume to buy at a time, I counted 750 split halves of varying sizes, plus broken pieces and slivers in 100 gms. Continue reading